Weekly Prompt Poems: Tea?

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Write a poem about having a cup of tea with someone you…don’t exactly like.

Apologies for the late post this week! I think you’ll enjoy these two poems just as much on a Sunday, though. 😉 


A Cup of Tea
by Carol R. Ward

Have a cup of tea, my dear –
it is the finest blend,
all the way from India –
you’ll like it in the end.

Have a cup of tea, my dear –
pray, how are things with you?
You’ve been so cold and distant,
not the man that I once knew.

Have a cup of tea, my dear –
to celebrate our life,
at least the way it was for me
when first I was your wife.

Have a cup of tea, my dear
Is that sweat upon your brow?
The poison you’ve imbibed today,
perhaps you feel it now.

Have a cup of tea, my dear –
feel the poison flow.
I saw you with that girl, my dear –
how could you stoop so low?

Have a cup of tea, my dear –
I see you wonder why
I wait ‘till now for my revenge,
why I feel that you must die.

Have a cup of tea, my dear –
you see she came to me –
she was with child; t’was living proof
of your infidelity.

Finish up your tea, my dear –
there’s no one left to tell.
She’s gone and so are you my dear –
you’re headed straight to hell.

###

Waiting for Karma
by Jamie DeBree

One lump or two?
I ask, somehow
managing to keep
my teeth ungritted.

None, you say,
blithely unaware of
the tension you
cause my soul.

Your smile over
the chipped china
makes me shiver
in abject revulsion.

Your humor, laughing
at some mundane
comment I made
almost undoes me.

Yet I sit,
serving second best
tea and tiny
sandwiches, making nice.

Waiting, praying for
the day when
karma catches up.
Repays the debt.


Check back next Saturday for more poetry! And check the writing prompt on Monday’s blog too, in case you might be interested in writing something to submit for this weekly post as well…

Weekly Prompt Poems: I Am Canadian

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Write a poem about the weather…include at least three different types of weather patterns. 


I Am Canadian
by Carol R. Ward

I awake to the fog
coating the world
like a blanket of white
that’s just been unfurled.
The tops of the hills
rise above the white mist
like islands alone
that the sun has just kissed.

Then out comes the sun,
burns the fog all away
and keeps getting stronger
for another hot day.
The temperature’s rising,
where will it stop?
The humidity’s climbing,
it’s over the top.

Then all of a sudden
along comes the wind –
it blows the clouds over
and shuts the sun in.
The temperature plummets,
the day grows quite dark –
we cancel our plans
to eat in the park.

Please tell me these flakes
of white that I see
are seeds from the birch tree –
what else could they be?
A warning of frost
is in place for tonight
and I wonder if tomorrow
will be green or be white.


Check back next Saturday for more poetry! And check the writing prompt on Monday’s blog too, in case you might be interested in writing something to submit for this weekly post as well…

Weekly Prompt Poems: Dream Desk & Waning of the Green

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Write a poem about something (anything) that is quickly going bad.


Dream Desk by Carol R. Ward

For oh, so long, I’ve had a dream
Since I first began to write –
it’s of the perfect writing desk –
I dreamed of it last night.

It’s not too big and not too small
but just the perfect size,
with pigeon holes for all my pens
and a roll top on the rise.

It’s made of aged, not antique wood
that’s polished to a sheen
I can see it sitting over there
at least within my dream.

And so I did a search online
to see what I could find –
lo and behold I saw it there
page listing ninety-nine.

I sent an email to the one
who had my desk for sale –
yes it was still available –
I thought my heart would fail.

But as my hopes were quickly raised
just as quickly were they dashed,
another party saw my desk
and visited with cash.

So just like that the bubble burst
upon my dream so fair
I vow to keep on searching
I’ll find that desk somewhere.

*******************************************

Waning of the Green by Jamie DeBree

Firm and oblong
I gently squeeze
looking for signs of give.

Every week it’s
a new challenge
‘twixt this ripening fiend and myself.

Will I catch
it in time,
before green turns to black?

Or will it
go mockingly mushy
while I wait for perfection.

###


Check back next Saturday for more poetry! And check the writing prompt on Monday’s blog too, in case you might be interested in writing something to submit for this weekly post as well…

News, Spoilers, & Weekly Writing Prompts

BSB News

An Elemental Earth Cover

We posted one poem for the prompts last week – a fun little eclipse-centered piece called The Warning by Alex Westhaven. Did you read it? If not, catch it at the link below:

Prompted Poetry: The Warning

Want to join the fun next week? Scroll down, grab a prompt and write a story or poem to submit!

Topic of the Week: Spoilers

I’ve spent a lot of time over the past few weeks doing my level best to avoid Game of Thrones spoilers online. I can’t watch on Sunday nights (due to getting ready for the work week and an unpredictable schedule), so I’ve been a week behind this whole season (if you can call so few episodes a “season”). I’m still a week behind, the season finale was last night, and I tell you what…it’s getting really hard to avoid having the show “spoiled” even when I’m just scrolling through headlines on my feed reader.

I mean…headlines. People seriously can’t write those things so as not to give spoilers? Lazy writing, I say.

Which brings me back to books. How do you feel about book spoilers? Whether revealed accidentially by an over-excited friend or reviewer, or by the author or publishing company in a blurb, trailer or whatever…do spoilers ruin the book for you, or are you still able to enjoy the story when you know what happens next or even how it ends?

I’m of two minds on spoilers (of any kind). I’ll still read/watch the full book or show even if I know what’s going to happen, because the story is in the journey, not the destination. But there’s definitely a missing tension when you already know the punchline that will flatten the funniest joke, and I think the same holds true of spoilers.

As to how spoilers spread…I think everyone should agree not to speak publicly about a show, movie, or book until at least one week after it’s been released. They can talk in private conversations or groups, of course, but no headlines, no public convos, nothing until a week later, to give everyone like me a chance to catch up without having to be all stressed out when we scroll our feeds. I don’t think that’s too much to ask, do you?


Wanna write? Pick a prompt!

Prose Writing Prompt of the Week: A character went to get his/her fortune read six years ago. Today, that fortune is coming true in the most unexpected way. Tell us about it…

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Write a poem about something (anything) that is quickly going bad.

Write a 500 – 1000 word story based on the prose prompt and/or a poem using the theme of the poetry prompt, and email it/them to brazensnake@brazensnakebooks.com. Poems will be posted on Saturdays, Prose on Sundays. Happy writing!

Weekly Poetry Prompt Stories: The Warning

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Write a poem about how ancient civilizations might have viewed/perceived an eclipse.


The Warning by Alex Westhaven

The air is strange today, my dear,
the sky is growing dim,
I’m not sure what to do, my dear,
and neither is the wind.

Night is falling quickly now,
though we’ve hours yet ‘til dusk,
We must join the others, quickly now,
and find out what to do.

The sun is black and ringed with fire,
the world must surely end,
the gods are angry and play with fire,
we’ll sacrifice to appease.

But wait — the world grows brighter now,
and darkness fades away,
we rise and smile, brighter now,
relieved to be alive.

A sacrifice still must be made, my dear,
to keep the gods at bay,
an honor to be the Chosen, my dear,
a lovely fire-god’s bride.

When you’re gone, we’ll think of you,
and the day the sun went black,
we’ll send our thanks and sing of you,
goddess of eternal night.


Check back next Saturday for more poetry! And check the writing prompt on Monday’s blog too, in case you might be interested in writing something to submit for this weekly post as well…

Weekly Poetry Prompt: Favorite or Least Favorite Carnival Rides

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Write a poem about your favorite or least favorite carnival ride.


Carnival by Carol R. Ward

The carnival, the carnival! Let’s go to the carnival!
There’s games and food and rides –
Test your skill or loop the loop
It’s so hard to decide.

The carousel spins round and round
as your steed glides up and down,
perhaps you’ll choose a horse to ride
or a swan that wears a crown.

A haunted house might be there too
to give a scary thrill
with ghosts and goblins jumping out
with wails and screams so shrill.

You can test your hand at driving
and crashing into things
at the bumper car enclosure
with the cars inside a ring.

The mighty Ferris wheel spins round
and takes you way up high
the view will take your breath away –
you can almost touch the sky.

Whirling, spinning, tilting round
the Tilt-A-Whirl goes wild
from side to side and up and down
the dream of every child.

The carnival, the carnival, let’s go to the carnival,
whether you’re big or small –
so many rides to choose from
and lord, I hate them all!

###

Swingin’ by Jamie DeBree

File in, load ‘em up!
Across a wide bench.
No oars in this long boat
just a cold steel machine.

Everyone in?
Arms up, bars down.
Hope you got the back seat
it’s the best one around.

Backwards and forwards
higher each time.
No touching that bar
But try not to scream.

Stomach flips at the apex
and you’re an inch off your seat.
Don’t worry, don’t look down
you’ll soon be on your back.

If Vikings had ships like
the ones at the fair
they’d be frustrated
at going nowhere.

Up and back
the big swing sways
a tire bumps the bottom
a rubber brake.

Just enough adrenaline
to wake you up
leave you refreshed and
perfect.

###


Check back next Saturday for more poetry! And check the writing prompt on Monday’s blog too, in case you might be interested in writing something to submit for this weekly post as well…

News, Reading New Authors, & Weekly Writing Prompts

BSB News

The Naughty List Cover

Like a little kink in your erotica? Last week’s freebie should have fit the bill quite nicely. Trinity Marlow’s The Naughty List is a romantic little erotic adventure that’s just 99 cents at your favorite etailer. If you missed the free download…pop over to the book page for links and an excerpt from the beginning!

The next freebie is ready to download now in the Available Books section…happy hunting!

Last week’s prompts inspired a poem posted Saturday by yours truly (it inspired prose too, but I didn’t get a chance to finish it, unfortunately). It’s a quick little read – check it out at the link below:

Prompted Poetry: About the House

Want to join the fun next week? Scroll down, grab a prompt and write a story or poem to submit!

Topic of the Week: Reading New Authors

I was out book shopping with a friend this past weekend, and picked up several books by authors I’ve never read (and a few by old favorites too). It made me think about how some people are more adventurous than others, and how I’ve heard that some people prefer to just stick with authors they know and love most of the time, rather than trying new whenever possible.

I was trying to remember if there was ever a time I didn’t want to try new authors, but I can’t. I’m always looking for the next great book, no matter who wrote it. My main criteria for book shopping is whether or not the random page I turn to when I open the book in the store engages me or not. Though I admit I do give more shopping “weight” to authors I love…and if my budget is limited, the known author gets my cash (if he/she has something new out, anyway).

Do you stick with authors you know, or do you actively seek out “new-to-you” authors to potentially love? Why?


Wanna write? Pick a prompt! Our local county fair is this week, so we have a pair of fair-themed prompts to work with:

Prose Writing Prompt of the Week: Someone figures out how to beat the carnival games and wins a big stuffed monkey. He/she gives it to a stranger – what happens?

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Write a poem about your favorite or least favorite carnival ride.

Write a 500 – 1000 word story based on the prose prompt and/or a poem using the theme of the poetry prompt, and email it/them to brazensnake@brazensnakebooks.com. Poems will be posted on Saturdays, Prose on Sundays. Happy writing!

Weekly Poetry Prompt: About the House

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Write a poem about your house (or a house you want). Do you like it? Love it? Hate it? Does it hate you?


My House by Jamie DeBree

Four green walls,
Three more for the garage,
A boundary between me and the world.

Fifties-style plan,
Four bedrooms if you squint,
Not nearly enough outlets for modern life.

Two plain bathrooms,
One in serious need of repair,
And a galley kitchen perfect for my needs.

Three picture windows,
Two fireplaces — one with stove,
An unassuming place to rest and play.

Imperfections are varied,
but it’s a good little house,
At least until another compels us to move.

###


Check back next Saturday for more poetry! And check the writing prompt on Monday’s blog too, in case you might be interested in writing something to submit for this weekly post as well…

Poetry Prompt: Jewelry Legends

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Pick a piece of jewelry (watch, earrings, necklace, cuff links, whatever) and make up a legend about it. Write the legend as a poem.

We have two similar legends this week…necklaces/pendents really do lend themselves well to legends, don’t you think? 


The Witch’s Daughters by Carol R. Ward

 

The legend:
Once there was a witch who had three daughters. A wizard, claiming they were evil, killed the witch, but as she died she sent her power into her children to protect them. Unable to kill the daughters, the wizard cursed them into feline form and then trapped them in a pendant. Legend has it that should the daughters ever be released from their prison, great evil would befall the world.

 

 

The poem: 

“I see the piece that’s caught your eye,”
the jeweler said to me.
“A special piece, to be sure,
the witch cats in a tree.”
He plucked the pendant from the case
and laid it in my palm;
it had a warmth all of its own,
yet radiated calm.
“Perhaps you’d find it interesting
the story of this piece,
the legend of the wizard’s curse
and how it brought us peace.”
I told him that was quite all right,
I’d heard it once before.
I paid the price he asked for it
and then I left the store.
The legend has been changed by time,
though parts of it are true;
I was there when the spell was cast,
this curse I now un-do.
The witch was not the evil one
nor her daughters three,
the ones cursed into feline form
to sit upon the tree.
And that was not enough for him
he cursed them further still
a living death trapped in the disk
from which the moonlight spills.
The wizard knew there was another
daughter to the witch
but she was just a tiny babe –
easily dismissed.
He left the babe alone within
the witch’s humble home
thinking that she’d surely die
while he was left to roam.
But she will be the wizard’s bane
as he will surely see.
Now that I am fully grown
I’ll set my sisters free.


The Blue Rose by Alex Westhaven

White pearls form a frame
’round a blue ‘namel rose,
a cheater of death, so
the old story goes.

Made for his firstborn
a match to his blood,
immortality its gift from
a sinister love.

As long as it hangs round
her neck her youth stays,
if the pendent’s removed
She’ll quickly show age.

Two more sisters make three,
but not really the same.
Experimental like her, all
pawns in his game.

Once immortal, now free,
she takes baby away,
leaving Misty alone
to make her own way.

Misty roams the dark halls
a soul with dark arts,
There’s a dagger to find,
poison-tipped for his heart.

When a stranger moves in
hiding from her worst woes,
she’ll find the pearl and blue pendant
in the shape of a rose.

###


Check back next Saturday for more poetry! And check the writing prompt on Monday’s blog too, in case you might be interested in writing something to submit for this weekly post as well…

 

News, Series Reading, & Weekly Writing Prompts

BSB News

Lemon Cream Cover

 

Did you find the sweet-tart freebie for last week? Lemon Cream by Trinity Marlow is an erotic tale that explores the consequences of daring to explore an out-of-the-norm lifestyle. We’ve added an excerpt to the book page – do you dare to go check it out?

Our next freebie is daring too…in a completely different sort of way. As always, you’ll find it somewhere in the Available Books section!

I decided to split the writing prompt post into two separate posts, to ensure plenty of room for more than one poem or story at a time. The poetry posts will go up each Saturday, and the flash fiction posts on Sunday. Except this week, apparently, because even I have trouble remembering new routines sometimes (shocking, eh?).

In any case, last week’s poetry prompt was all about our favorite summer desserts, and I posted a poem this past Saturday called Just Desserts – you can read it here. I did not post a flash story on Sunday, but next week, look for that post as well.

And of course check out the writing prompts at the end of this post…if something inspires you, send in the results!

Topic of the Week: Series Reading

Unless you really are a hermit, you know that the next season of Game of Thrones premiered last week on HBO (I just watched it this past weekend – good stuff!). The TV series is now past where the last book in the series left off, and is forging its own way through the long-awaited “winter”. I’ll admit to not having read the books yet, even though I did start the first one and was intrigued enough that I wanted to keep reading, but…I didn’t.

Why? Because George R.R. Martin is a notoriously slow writer, and honestly, I don’t want to start reading the books if there’s a chance the written series will never be finished. I don’t want to get sucked into the larger overreaching book-world and then end up standing on the edge of a literary cliff, waiting forever for closure. I hate that.

There are plenty of book series I do read, of course. I wait rather impatiently for the next mass market paperback of several current series to come out (I hate hardbacks, but hubby and I both read these and he prefers print). We buy them and read them and then wait impatiently for the next one, which we know will be coming, because these authors don’t disappoint.

I haven’t released any series yet that follow the same characters through multiple books, but I’m working on a few. When I do release those, it will only be after I have the second one pretty well done and the third started, just to make sure I don’t leave readers who enjoy the first book hanging too long for the second. Because I think that’s important.

How long are you willing to wait for the next book in a series that follows the same characters from book to book? Are you the patient “I’d wait forever” sort, or do you need a somewhat more reliable schedule before you’ll jump on with a series?

 


Wanna write? Pick a prompt!

Prose Writing Prompt of the Week:  Someone who’s never seen a dragon before is just seeing one for the first time. What do they see? Feel? Hear? What happens to them after (do they run, stay, escape, get eaten)?

Poetry Prompt of the Week: Pick a piece of jewelry (watch, earrings, necklace, cuff links, whatever) and make up a legend about it. Write the legend as a poem.

Write a 500 – 1000 word story based on the prose prompt and/or a poem using the theme of the poetry prompt, and email it/them to brazensnake@brazensnakebooks.com. Poems will be posted on Saturdays, Prose on Sundays. Happy writing!